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Google allows Spotify its own in-app payment option in new pilot

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  • Users can either use Spotify’s payment system or Google Play Billing.
  • Pilot to participating developers to offer additional billing option.
  • App developers have complained about Google, Apple’s payment systems.

Google on Wednesday said it would allow Spotify to use its own payment system in its Android app as part of a new pilot aimed at countering app makers’ concerns about high fees and allegedly anticompetitive behaviour.

Users who have downloaded Spotify from the Google Play Store will be presented with a choice to pay with either Spotify’s payment system or with Google Play Billing in some countries in the coming months.

The pilot will allow a small number of participating developers, starting with Spotify, to offer an additional billing option next to Google Play’s billing system in their apps.

“This pilot will help us to increase our understanding of whether and how user choice billing works for users in different countries and for developers of different sizes and categories,” Google said in a blog post.

Under a new competition law in South Korea last year, Google also said it would allow developers to introduce a second payment system alongside its own there.

Spotify said its trial with Google was part of a “multi-year agreement,” without elaborating.

App developers such as Spotify that sell digital goods have complained for years about having to use the official payment systems of the Play Store and Apple’s App Store.

Google and Apple collect up to 30% of each payment as a fee, which developers say is too high. Both have lowered fees in many circumstances and have said that they are needed to fund a safe and secure mobile ecosystem.

Google did not specify the fee that it would collect in the new pilot.

The company is ramping up enforcement of its Google Play Billing requirement, and it has said non-compliant apps could be blocked from publishing updates starting on Friday.

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Another X, previously Twitter, outage has affected Pakistan.

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Adding to the current difficulties with online connectivity, internet users in Pakistan experienced yet another disturbance when attempting to use the services of social media site X, formerly known as Twitter.

Users from Islamabad and other regions of the nation were unable to use the site for several hours since the service was down.

The Pakistan Telecommunication Authority (PTA), which is becoming increasingly concerned about the frequent outages, has not made an official remark about the matter.

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Pakistan

Elections 2024: On February 8, a “suspension” of cellphone and internet services was suggested.

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The suggestion was made at the meeting of the ECP, which was convened to examine the state of law and order in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Balochistan.

According to those with knowledge of the situation, there was a suggestion to cut back on mobile and internet service in vulnerable sections of the nation in time for the general elections in 2024.

The election candidates’ security was also a topic of discussion during the conference, and CEC Sikandar Sultan Raja voiced his worries about the rise in attacks on political gatherings in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Balochistan.

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Pakistan

Government Decides to Take Action: Solangi Denounces Journalist Harassment Campaign

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The troll army of a political party has been harassing Journalist Gharidah Farooqui, and the Caretaker Government has strongly objected to this nasty and shady campaign, according to Caretaker Minister for Information Murtaza Solangi.

He warned that disclosing someone’s home address or private phone number amounted to encouraging violence and harassment and would not be allowed in a post on the social media site “X.”

The Minister went on to say that the appropriate authorities are looking into the situation and that the offenders and those who assist them will face consequences in accordance with the law.

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